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Susan Weill


sue weill

Email: weill@txstate.edu
Office: Old Main 206
Phone: 512-245-3486

Courses:
MC 3355, Mass Media & Society (online through TRACS and also on campus)
MC 4302, History of Mass Media (online through TRACS)
MC 4305, Theories of Mass Communication (online through TRACS)
MC 4356G, Magazine Writing (on campus)
MC 4382L, Feature Writing (online through TRACS)
MC 5301, Mass Media & Society (online through TRACS)
MC 5304Y, Feature Writing (online through TRACS)

 

Dr. Susan Weill, a tenured associate professor, has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in the Texas State School of Journalism & Mass Communication since 2002. Her research on the mass media relates to race and ethnicity, an interest she developed while growing up in rural Mississippi during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.

She holds a bachelor’s degree in history (Millsaps College, 1975), a master’s degree in mass communication (Jackson State University, 1993) and a doctorate in communication (University of Southern Mississippi, 1998). Her dissertation, ‘In a Madhouse’s Din’: Civil Rights Coverage by Mississippi's Daily Press, 1948-1968, was published by Praeger in 2002. Her research can be found in American Journalism, The Press and Race, Journalism Studies and the Journal of Mississippi History.

As someone intrigued by cultures, Dr. Weill worked with the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians to record oral histories with elders that resulted in TV and radio documentaries. She assisted First Nations in Canada as a Fulbright scholar by consulting with freelance writers and reporters at the Aboriginal Multi-Media Society’s radio station and at the newspaper Windspeaker. She also taught at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica as a Fulbright scholar. With a research grant from the American Council on Germany, she collected oral histories from Black Germans involved with Initiative Schwarze Menschen in Deutschland.

A recent convert to designing and teaching online courses, a pedagogical method she views as providing students an important alternative to campus classes, she completed the prestigious Sloan-C Certification Program in online teaching in 2014. “With good use of digital technology, online classes can provide students with an interesting and positive experience,” she said. “Online students can watch or listen to lectures at their own convenience and they save time and money by not having to commute to campus.”

Dr. Weill is a member of the American Journalism Historians Association (AJHA) and the International Association for Literary Journalism Studies (IALJS). She is a founding member and serves on the board of the Texas State Women and Gender Research Collaborative. She also serves on the editorial board of the WGRC Journal of Research on Women and Gender.

She represented the College of Fine Arts & Communication on the Texas State Faculty Senate (2013-16) and now serves the School of Journalism & Mass Communication as the Texas State Faculty Senate Liaison.